Friday, May 25, 2012

Promoting Yourself On The Internet

-By Serge Birault



Yes, I know, you're an artist, you hate maketing. Self promoting is too boring and time consuming for you and it's a waste of time.

You're all wrong …

If you are a freelancer, you cannot spend your time searching for clients. 20 years ago, I only worked for clients living in my own town or on my own country. It no longer works this way. I'm working for clients all over the world now. The internet is an incredible tool for sharing your work, but you have to find a way to make you visible on the internet. Here are some key points:

* Website :
Having your own website is a necessity. It's the link you send to your clients.
DON'T DO IT YOURSELF. You're an illustrator not a designer, it's not the same job. Ok, you're able to do good pictures - that doesn't mean you able to do good designs, it's often the opposite. Illustrators websites are usually the worst websites ever. Ask to a webdesigner to do it for you. And ask him/her to do one which can be easily updated. Yes, I know - it costs money.
Keep in mind only people who know your name can find it.

* Blog :
A lot of artists have a blog because it's easier to create and update. It cannot replace a website because it's not a gallery, and it could be hard to find a specific post or specific pictures. However, you can post articles, news, WIPs and/or videos, and it could be very interesting for those who like your work AND those who have an interest in your processes, articles, videos, etc.
People can follow you so they will be informed if you update your blog and they can share your posts too.Keep in mind most of your followers work in the same field as you.

* Forums :
There are various forums on the internet. The main goal of posting on forums is to have comments or critics of your work; Well, in fact, it should be the main goal. Most of us post on forums to promote ourselves. Yes, I know, it's a bit weird but it's true. Of course, we like having kind or constructive comments but the real motivation is only to have your pictures viewed by a lot of people. If you really want honest critics, have some honest illustrator friends give you feedback.
Let me explain to you how it works…
All forums have a front page system, which means moderators choose pictures every day / week / month. All of those pictures have, of course, more exposure than the others. Being a forum moderator is a quite a difficult (and unpaid) job. They often have a list of artists who usually do good work, which they use to choose the pictures on the front page. It's normal, we can't blame them for that. They try to promote emerging artists too, but it's more difficult because they have to sift through all of the pictures submitted. And there are a lot of pictures.
If you are on the list, it's not a problem, you can be sure to be viewed and followed. The more famous you are, the less your comments are honest. It may sound strange but it's all about politics. It's not easy to dare writing negative comments on a well known artist's picture, and it could be dangerous because we are a community. There are friends, enemies, clans, polite relationships and sometimes hate. That's why I said : if you want honest critics, have honest friends.
If you're not on the list, you have to try to be a part of it. So, try to post your better works and be patient, it's the only solution. A little advice for all the beginners - wait a little bit before posting on a forum. Some pictures I posted 10 years ago are still visible on the internet, and, believe me, I'm not very proud of some of them!
When forums are too big, the list becomes too long. So the people on the list move to another forum, and the forum slowly died. Sad but true.
By the way, a lot of websites share frontpage pictures, and potential clients sometimes find you directly by this way.
Forums are usually owned by publishers. If you have a bad relationship with these publishers, don't expect to have too much exposure on their forum. Just sayin'.

* Social networks :
A «new» and interesting way to promote yourself. Try to avoid merging your «personal» page and your «pro» page. Sometimes, people who like your work want to learn more about your life. Just don't forget they're not «real» friends, just «virtual» ones. Real friendship is not pushing a «like» button. However, you can find new «real» friends this way, from all over the world.
You can easily exchange messages with artists you like too. I spoke for the first time with some of my idols via facebook.
Social networks are great tools to post your works and get quick feedback, sometimes by people who don't have any interest on illustration and who don't know you. They can share your work with a simple click. I discovered a lot of great artists who don't post on CG forums. Sometimes it's very useful. I use it to post my WIPs and I often have interesting critics or new ideas. On the other hand, social networks are crawling with chaos and VERY time consuming. Use them carefully.

*Clients :
"We cannot pay you but we will promote you". I think you already know this sentence. Simple advice - NEVER work for free. Of course, you can work for a cheap price if you are sure your client can REALLY promote you, in efficient way.
Don't forget : Happy clients make good publicity. I worked for a famous Spanish band last year and they mention my name everytime they can.

*Other ways :
You have to know your audience. I know the people who follow me are usually in the CG field, and they follow me because I do technical stuff, so I share my WIPs and do tutorials and videos.
The others are pin up fans, so I share pictures of lovely models, pin up photographers or other pin up artists.

*Audience
Of course, this is not mathematics. You can have large audience on the internet without all of this. But it's more difficult. It depends of what you do, your skills, your relationships … A lot of parameters you cannot really control. If you have large audience, know what to do with it. You cannot have news or new stuff to show everyday. You can fill up this empty space in an efficient way by promoting other artists, for example.

*Last words :
It's a very cynical article, I know. It's about how to sell yourself. Artists think their works are not products, but they are wrong. We have to earn money with our pictures. So we sometimes have to think about how to sell them.
Promoting yourself is boring and time consuming, that's right. However, don't forget that the internet can be a wonderful place. You can discover incredible artists, speak with them and share their works. You can learn new techniques, find inspiration or motivation, etc. The internet is not just a market place.

74 comments:

  1. What are some forums you recommend posting on?

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Well, CGTalk 2D forum is nearly dead. CGHub is the big deal right but I (we) think it will become TOO big very soon. I no longer post on conceptart.org so I don't know if it's still interesting or not ...
      DeviantArt is probably too "open" to be a very interesting promotional tool.
      I think social networks, especially facebook, is now the more efficient way to share your work. But, it's very time consuming tool.

      Delete
    2. Ouais Facebook c'est bien mais faut avoir déjà une petite notoriété...Sinon tes followers ne seront pas très nombreux...
      Faut bouffer du forum accompagné d'un site/blog mis à jour souvent pour grossir sa notoriété...Mais c'est un travail dantesque de nos jours...car il y a énormément d'artistes amateur/semi-pro/pro qui postent et veulent gloire et fortune...

      Delete
    3. Ah oui j'oubliais, faut être aussi très doué xD...mais cela va de soit !

      Delete
    4. CGHub is big and full of professional artists who work for bigger studios or already well-known. It's harder to get noticed if you are new and a "nobody."

      Delete
    5. Indeed ... Moderators really do their job and it's diificult for them. They always try to find emerging artists but it's not easy. Too many people ...

      Delete
  2. and now millions of artists start to do the list :D

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  3. Hi Serge Birault,

    Since you're supporting self-promotion, I was hoping you could give me a quick and short portfolio review, I know this is out of the blue, but it's a way to promote too isn't it?
    Here is the link:
    lamlu.carbonmade.com

    Thanks a tons!

    Lam

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lol. Well done :)
      Give me your e-mail adress, I will reply :D
      Here's mine: serge.birault@hotmail.fr

      Delete
  4. "DON'T DO IT YOURSELF. You're an illustrator not a designer, it's not the same job. "

    I just wanted to reply to say ^this x 1'000'000! Some of my most talented illustrator friends have the worst websites imaginable - to the extent that a less able artist with a better/cleaner site looks much better.

    I'm not a freelancer anymore but I do run my own (very small) studio & all of the above advice is excellent.

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    1. Thank AJ (and happy to see you here :)).
      I'm lucky guy, my beloves is a talented webdesigner, so I have a new and beautiful website every year :D
      (Subliminal promotion for Chloé ^o^)

      Delete
  5. Great article and that's the way it works. Only few can speak so powerfully trough their work that they don't have to 'sell them selves'. I work in advertisement company and part time as illustrator/graphic desginer. I don't even have portfolio on the internet and there's still jobs constantly. I think good advise is also to training social skills, enough honesty and professionalism, good pricing + naturally convincing artistic/design skills.

    Also explaining customer/s why some of their ideas aren't working and why some of yours would work better is something on must learn. Or you can take some of the ideas that work and refine them with your professional skills and show them that your professional artist/designer and you know the field and what works for certain groups or target group of people the customer is looking for.

    If it's a personal work for someones living room etc. then of course there's no need to think so widely.

    If one decides to put up portfolio it definetly should show only the best works and as in many other things the rule: "quality over quanity" works. List of customers and good customer statements and feedbacks (good ones :) ) on the site are also good I think.

    - Jussi

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    1. I agree. Most of the time, our job is not to do a good picture, our job is doing a good picture for a product. It's not the same thing ...
      Artistic directors are here to help us to balance quality and efficiency; but being able to do it by yourself is a part of the job.

      Delete
  6. NEVER work for free. >>> i'm just curious, would you suggest this even to those who are just starting in the field?

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    1. Yes. Work = money.
      Never believe someone who tell you exposure is more important than money :D
      Painting is our job not a hobby.

      Delete
    2. You have bills to pay also, even when you start the bussiness. It's also true that one must have to put price down enough to attract customers and not to scare them. You have to balance things and explain why some job costs more than other. You can price by how many hours you must work on the piece/design/logo etc. for example. Of course, if you get popular you can start raising your fee. You have more work experience --> get more professional ---> skills get better ---> more customers (and if there's too much customers, you can assort the ones that are willing to pay for quality and the ones that wan't the moon for few bucks or six pack of beer. There's few resons to rice your price time to time...

      - Jussi

      Delete
    3. I'd disagree on never working for free. There are times when it can be appropriate but you have to balance out WHO it is that you're doing it for free for, and WHAT are the perceived benefits of doing so. In other words - what else can they do for you that might be to your benefit? It doesn't have to be straight away, but someday.

      More than once a 'favour' that I've done for someone else has turned into a paid job further down the track based on something this person has done or said.

      cheers
      Sean

      Delete
    4. I sometimes do pictures for friends. they apid me with beers :)

      Delete
    5. I recently did a painting of a train for my sister-in-law. I have never done a train before in my life, but I took the job. I charged my sis for it at my usual rate and it took some explanation as to why it cost so much. The big reason is that the painting will be around for a long time. I don't want my name attached to a piece I'm not proud of and I intended to give the painting 100% effort. That level of effort deserved compensation.

      Never give discounts, it devalues the work you've done for other people. Increase your rates as you improve but never decrease your rates.

      Always give 100% effort into every piece you do.

      Never work for free. The person asking you for artwork doesn't work for free and neither should you.

      This is meant to reply to 'projectmagellan.net' not to Serge's comment about working for beer. Working for a good beer is a noble cause :)

      Delete
    6. Wow great article ! And so true never work free it is just selling yourself and every artist you know short. The next time that same client comes to you and wants you to do some work for free and you give them a bill ... well no more needs to be said. That client will want a freebie every time they talk with you though.

      Delete
    7. As a writer/graphics person, I occasionally do free work. However, it's usually either the "family rate" or for a cause or organization that I believe in.

      I don't do free work for anyone who promises "exposure". That's just another word for "rip you off".

      Delete
  7. Bon, moi j'en ai marre Serge, non seulement t'es un crack en dessin, t'écris super bien et ta femme est une bombe ET une boss en webdesign.

    Moi en attendant je suis webdesigner, mes clients sont des exorcistes/vendeur de canapés/courtier en assurances/strip-teaseuses (non ce n'est pas une blague).

    Mes deux questions sont celles-ci : est-ce que tu as la chance de choisir tes clients? Et penses-tu que le fait de savoir bien dessiner soit un don, que ce soit inné?

    Merci!
    Kiss kiss

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Lol ^^
      Oui, j'ai la chance de pouvoir choisir mes clients mais je pense qu'on est pas nombreux dans ce cas, malheureusement ...
      Et non, le talent, ça n'existe pas. L'entraînement, y'a qu'ça d'vrai. Certaines personnes apprennent plus vite que d'autres, c'est tout.
      (au fait, ici, il vaut mieux parler anglais, on est pas nombreux à comprendre le français).

      Translation:
      *Do you choose your clients?
      Yes, I'm lucky, I can choose my clients :)
      *Does "talent" exist?
      I don't think so. Only training. Some people just learn faster than others.

      Delete
  8. What do you think of www.itsartmag.com? Just curious.
    Also, do you think that posting your stuff in the "wrong" places (that is, forums that are not considered cool or professional) can be detrimental?

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    1. It's Art is not a big forum but a lot of websites share it. A single guy works on it and it's a very harsh job. It doesn't owned by sponsor or publisher (by choice) and I like that :)

      Delete
  9. Serge,

    Very good article. Digital art and social media are both evolving in many interesting ways. Out of this chaos might come progress or anarchy. Either are beneficial for the artist. It will be interesting to watch.

    Your Facebook page is a good template for people wanting to go in a social media direction (I'm there as Tony Lane). I know writers who have used it to great advantage. On your page you are quite open and chatty, this is good. Some other artists there have pages that seem to say, "This is my work. I am God! Worship me." That does not make a page that I am anxious to return to.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. I think a lot of illustrators are not social animals :)
      Probably because, when we're freelancing, we use to work alone.
      Most of us only share their pictures because they don't have time to talk or because they don't know what to tell about their works.
      I try to be chatty but I can't reply to every messages or comments. It's impossible ...

      Delete
  10. It can never be said often enough, NEVER work for free. A promise of promotion/publicity is almost certainly useless and, besides, all you will be promoting is that you work for free. Nice article.

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  11. Very happy that you are now part of this blog! Your straight forward honesty really drives home even the basic concepts, and of course your art is simply amazing. You're an inspiration!

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  12. Great post! I really enjoyed it, especially as I'm getting more involved in making my illustration studio's site more visible (dabbling with SEO, Google rankings and the like). I think it is strange that while I've been doing this I've stumbled across more and more blog posts highlighting the importance of the Internet in getting your work out there and reaching new audiences.

    I partly agree with your statement about getting a professional to do your site. I've been developing ours and it takes a LOT of time getting everything up and running. Even now it still needs work and is a bit rough round the edges but at least it's functional and works. However, I must say that I think it is in any freelancers interest to learn about this stuff. It will help you know what's going on and hopefully prevent unskilled web developers taking you for a ride. I've heard of sites that while they looked nice were designed so badly that search engines couldn't find them and others were nice but impossible for the client to update themselves. I believe a little knowledge in this department could save a freelancer a lot of money and help them avoid a large number of the pitfalls associated with websites.

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  13. Wondering why you no longer post on Concept Art. I try to now and then but it has changed and we need some good people back posting again.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. I no longer post on conceptart.org because I wad already on too many forums :)
      Some of my best friend, like Aly Fell are still very active on this forum.
      Conceptart is more a "real" forum. You post here to have feedbacks, not really to promote yourself :)

      Delete
  14. Excellent advice! Hopefully I may need to remember it one day :)

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  15. I've been trying to stay away from forums because I tend to talk to much and ask to many follow up questions. Know what I mean?

    I don't have a blog or website yet because as a part time/still learning artist I need to improve my productivity. Slowly working on it.

    Basically my approach lately is to try to do what Danoto has suggested a few times... keep my head down and paint... which usually requires a healthy dose of Greg Manchess's advice... "finish the damn thing already"...

    Thanks for your advice,

    Mike

    ...and last sometimes I think I shouldn't post things after I have written them, but I do anyways.

    ReplyDelete
  16. While I understand the reasoning behind telling illustrators not to do their own websites, I have to say that I really think illustrators would do well to do their own sites if they can. Some schools, like the one I went to, made sure their students were equally good at illustration and design. The advice we were given was that it's nice to have your own site where you can feature your work, but it's nicer still if you can say you designed and (even coded) the website yourself as well (as long as it's just as well-done as your illustrations, of course). On the other hand, some of these schools, while they teach you how to design a website, don't teach you how to actually code it. I ended up minoring in Computer Science in order to do that. While it didn't teach me website coding specifically, learning C, C++, Java, etc., certainly made learning HTML and other web languages a breeze.

    I almost think that, anymore, designers and illustrators alike are going to have to learn how to do this stuff if they want to stay competitive. But...I'm not exactly old hand at this, so I can't say that with absolute certainty. It does seem to be the way things are going, though. A design firm I worked for loved my illustrations. They loved even more that I could also do web design.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Of ourse, they could have skills in both fields but you have to admit illustration and design are two different jobs ;)

      Delete
  17. Thank you for this advice. I've been trying to branch out in all these ways for a while, but it's difficult to make connections with people. I still have a bit of studying and practice to get my skill up to par to get noticed though. Do you recommend setting up a facebook fanpage? or having people follow your personal page? I can imagine facebook getting overwhelming with followers - and it might be tough to keep in touch with personal friends/family..

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    1. I dunno. I have both ... Some people like to see my final pictures and my WIP (on my "like" page), some people like to see more personal stuff, the pictures or the music I listen to ...

      Delete
  18. Great topic, with a lot of good advice! Every serious artist should have a web presence for promotional purposes.

    Probably most artists should have a pro make their website, but I chose to create my own. I have too much of a DIY mentality to let someone else do it. Plus I can make updates and change things at will. However it IS a lot of work to set up and maintain a website, and it involves much more than just the web design: technical issues, search engine optimization, organization of content, etc. To me it is a challenge and "fun" to go through the process of website creation, but there is a steep learning curve.

    I have a creative process blog, but I am out of the norm there as well. My blog is incorporated into my website, not hosted by Blogger or similar hosts. I decided that if I am going to all the trouble to write blog articles, why should all that good link juice go somewhere else? Yes, blogger is a big platform and makes blogging easy. But I get a ton of search engine traffic to my site via my blog, which otherwise would go to Blogger!

    One topic you did not cover that is important is the concept of posting your art online and all that it implies. There is a very good chance your art could be misused by unscrupulous people! My advice is to keep your images on the smaller side, just big enough that your audience will appreciate them, but not big enough make a decent print. I also make it a habit to watermark my website name on my images, in a tasteful way like a signature in the corner. It is commonplace for people to snag images and post them on their site without attribution. If your image is watermarked, viewers will at least know the source. Of course the watermark can be cropped or photoshopped out, but usually that is too much bother for the average person. Also, formally copyright your works with the Library of Congress for full legal protection if you need it.

    Serge, I took a look at your facebook page. WOW, over 10,000 likes and a very high interaction rate. All in less than a year, very impressive. I just started a facebook page, and I'm starting to wonder if it is worth the trouble. Can you comment on how you managed that? Did it help to have a strong presence on forums?

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Everytima you put something on the internet, you take the risk that someone steal it. I've got a entire folder full of plagiarism :)
      It's not very important as long as nobody earn money with your work.

      Delete
  19. What do you think of this?
    "How to create a free portfolio website using WordPress.com"
    http://escapefromillustrationisland.com/2010/02/04/how-to-create-a-free-portfolio-website-using-wordpress-com/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wordpress is a powerful tool, my website was done with it ;)

      Delete
    2. Thanks for posting that link!

      Delete
    3. Wordpress freaking rules. I actually just made the switch from Blogger to Wordpress recently, and it's amazing how customizable the new site is. I was able to use a template to set up both an illustration and design portfolio (which was important to me, because I'm absolutely atrocious at web coding), and it's been fantastic so far. My main site is my blog, with subpages for portfolio work and contact info. Highly recommended.

      Also, if you have the cash to spare, you can get some WICKED premade gallery-style themes from places like press75.com

      Delete
  20. A note on websites:

    Don't use flash or make it too fancy. Art Directors are busy and don't want to wade through a bunch of things you feel are cool before getting to your artwork. Just put your art up there on the first (index) page. Put links to your blog, bio and contact information if people want to click on it, but the first view someone should have is of your artwork.

    Make each image open up in it's own url and add a clickable link to get you back to your /index. If you want to get fancy, add some information about your piece (size, method and time spent). The important part is the unique url for each image, this is so an Art Director can cut and paste a single picture into an email or twitter. You'd be surprised at how many times an AD will see an image and think "I can't use this, but my buddy over at National Geographic could.."

    If you can, get a website address that includes your name. Use your name for almost everything, it's easier for people to remember.

    Serge, you're a great addition to this blog! Good to read your comments and thanks for the insight!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. Keep it simple et clear. If viewers have to many click to do to see your pictures, they will leave.

      Delete
  21. "DON'T DO IT YOURSELF. You're an illustrator not a designer, it's not the same job. "

    Funnily enough I don't 100% agree with that. I do know what you mean though.
    After a long break (some 6/7 year) from art, I slowly waded my way back in through aiding my editor from a music magazine I used to write for. I started simply by helping with layouts, but ultimately rebranded / redesigned the publication and through that the website etc too.
    The point is, I learned comic illustration, and through that the art of GOOD layouts, how a user interfaces / 'reads' something and so much more that many web designers never learn 9let's face it - there are some UGLY websites out there, and some beautiful ones that just plain don't work). I think if you can learn to look at your skills and reapply them - or find yourself in a position where those core skills seep out naturally, artists and illustrators have the potential to be the best web designers (if they can be bothered with all the code and whatnot).
    Anyways, thats my thoughts - great post on the whole though, and one I'm sure to pass onto others!

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Yep, the goal is not to have the most beautiful website but the more "efficient". Illustrators tend to forget that :)

      Delete
  22. speaking of shameless plugs, and online networks...
    the crew over at Awesome Horse Studios started this facebook group for sharing/critiquing and discussion art and illustration, it's very active right now... i find myself wanting to see what's new on there multiple times a day, so i'd recommend checking it out.
    it's good times:
    http://www.facebook.com/groups/awesomehorse/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There's a lot of interesting (and often small) groups on FB ;)

      Delete
  23. I think it's important to not think of your work as a product while you are making it though. However, when you are doing the task of promoting yourself, then you can think of it as a product. I remember a great quote I read, it was about videogames but it applies here.

    "It is the artist's job to create a the most beautiful and personal work that he or she can, and it is the marketer's job to create a product out of that work."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When you are freelance, I think you sometimes have to be your own marketer ;)

      Delete
  24. Damn Serge, caused a long thread.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Hi Serge!

    Awesome post, all of your tips are very important. I'd add one more tip: Participate in events and meet people on the field.

    I mean, I know it's not related to internet directly, but if you happened to be in events, don't be shy and talk to people, get your business card on everyone's hand and get their card too. This way you can contact good clients or good artists and make a good networking via internet lately, like having your twitter account followed by a great artist. This things help a lot in terms of promotion!

    By the way, are you going to be at San Diego Comic Con this year?

    Thank you for sharing your knowledge, it means a lot for us artists!
    Alice

    http://alicemonstrinho.daportfolio.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Alice,
      You're right. Wehen you're a friend with other artists, you tend to promote them and they tend to promote you :)

      San Diego Comic Con ... Well, it will be hard, I have already too much travels to do this year. May be next one :)

      Delete
  26. Very handy post. Thanks for compiling all of this together, Serge!

    I wanted to add a note about blogs, which have become quite the useful tools over time. I know that on Wordpress and Blogger they also have the ability to add a Page, which adds a tab to a navigation menu to the top of the blog linking to the pages that you add. I've built my entire webpage using Wordpress' Page system ( http://www.angelicshades_ ) and it has saved my life with its professional looking skins and easy to update gallery function. Best of all, it is completely free.

    I've found adding Pages to blogs to be a great way to make not just a blog, but to make your blog a hub which acts like a webpage. You can set the Pages as forwarding links instead so you can link to another page which you have already constructed. For example, I have a Shop page linking to my Etsy shop, then another link to my already established webpage through the Gallery page, all from within my blog.

    For a working example, you can see my blog: http://blog.angelicshades.com

    It's a simple solution for those who maybe cannot afford to build their own websites and need a way to link through to other freely built pages OR who just want a quick reference for fans who find their blog before they find their actual website.

    Another tip for those with little budget and no coding knowledge is to build a page on Facebook instead. You can use a Page name as a username now so you won't have to link to your real account, keeping you from getting spammed with Friend requests. Albums are easy to update and it's always nice to know people can sign up to see your updates on a large community like that.

    Best of luck to all of us in this wide world of shiny technology!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Angela,

    yep I look at wordpress as a content management system have used them for everything from galleries and project hubs to e commerce sites. You can set the pages as the landing spot and the blog in background or the shopping center as landing and the blog in back or the blog out front etc ... But some of these configs you must have it hosted on your own server with your own domain. As well blogger and wp free blogs have there own uses as well.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Look at my url here a good example of part of your comment as well. Even building lenses over at squidoo helps too ... doing this a few hours a week as well link , link and link again ... no matter what if you want to do well trade links , ask for links, pay sometimes for links ...

      Delete
  28. I don't think ANYONE who ever promised me further jobs in payment for a bargain price has yet followed through with their end of the bargain.

    I have experienced this reality and a major project last summer consisting of 5 murals, and a sculpted sign for a new restaurant finally taught me this essential lesson.

    Business people make promises, but unless it is in a legal contract they will forget about it. Even with a contract they like to "forget" to pay at they end.

    Be honest, do great work, and stick up for yourself is my advice. Thanks for the nice post!

    ReplyDelete
  29. "DON'T DO IT YOURSELF. You're an illustrator not a designer, it's not the same job. " - I'm lucky guy, my beloves is a talented webdesigner,"

    That's why you buy into that. Designers are always telling illustrators that they are they professionals and that illustrators are just the hired talent. Crap. Designers are the ones that 'can't draw'.

    Illustrators ! Rise up - build your own websites ! Never give in to designer tyranny !!!

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  30. Very nice article, Serge! I also like what you said about the CG Communities, I share the same point of view :)

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  31. Hi Serge
    I'm Yinxuan, thank you for this great article, it's very useful.
    I didn't know those forums have a list of artists, I started to post my works on forums just about last year, I think sometimes I was really lucky to be choosed on the front page so quickly...
    I would like to know how do you think about the agent?
    I have an English agent, it offered the jobs to do the cards and books for children with a low price, and a France agent, it offers usually the jobs in advertising, but I didn't get a lot client by them, most of the works that I did are from the contact directly without an agent, is it normal?

    ReplyDelete
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  33. What's happened though.....over promoting. Same thing happened with musicians when they were all stating if we give away our music our business will increase. I have never seen so many poor musicians in my life within the past 2 years since that philosophy surfaced. Now we have anew issue, over promoting yourself to the pint of ruining your business and your image online. It's very common on Facebook, and many of the social sites.

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  34. I would be appreciating all of your articles and blogs because they are fitting up mark.
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  35. Very handy post. Thanks for posting!

    ReplyDelete
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