Sunday, January 27, 2013

Jeff Miracola, Acrylic Painting Demo

Jeff Miracola is an illustrator, best known for his work on the trading card game, Magic: The Gathering.

Jeff works in a variety of different mediums, both digital and traditional, and has actually developed a wide range of styles over the years. When working traditionally, he brings a sense of spontaneity and fearlessness to his painting that is really refreshing to see.

Jeff has been nice enough to share some of his process in this video.


26 comments:

  1. Jeff,
    That is excellent. Thank you for sharing!!

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  2. Thanks, Jeff and Dan, for sharing this. Great stuff!
    The bloopers is a nice touch as well.

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  3. I try not use 'epic' to describe things, but its the best word for this post. Thank you

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  4. Outstanding, I'm just blown away. Thanks guys.

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  5. Amazing stuff! Love your process! Am now a life long fan! What did you say your name was again? Ah!...Got it! Thank you.

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  6. Thanks Dan for sharing this, this kind of stuff is priceless. I'm going to hang out on Jeff webpage right now as consideration ;->

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  7. thank you for posting this one! video like that makes me feel more and more passion for drawing! and thank's to Jeff for sharing is creative process!

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  8. Love, love, love watching the artistic process in action. I always learn something. Thanks for posting this. More please. :)

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  9. Ooh, gonna go and get some acrylic paints :D inspiring stuff!

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  10. What a great video; thank you for posting it, and to Jeff for sharing. Does anyone have recommendations about what kind of Loew-Cornell brushes? I've heard other painters use them, too, and I'm wondering if I should buy their nicer ones individually, or just stick with the cheap multi-packs.

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    1. It honestly depends on how you paint. Personally, I am really rough on my brushes, so it's not worth spending a lot of money on them. Instead, I just buy a lot of cheap brushes, beat them to hell, and then throw them out. However, if you're the kind of person that is gentle on their brushes, and willing to wash them everyday, a quality brush can last you for years and is well worth the investment.

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    2. I agree with Dan on this. I beat up my brushes and I don't take the best care with them. So cheap is the way to go. However, cheap doesn't mean they are bad brushes. They do exactly what I need them to do and that's priceless in my book. I buy my brushes from a local craft store (Michaels) or online at ASWExpress.com. These are what I get:
      http://www.aswexpress.com/discount-art-supplies/brushes-palette-knives-and-accessories/oil-and-acrylic-brushes/loew-cornell-la-corneille.html

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  11. I'll just mention that this makes me feel much less bad about the materials and methods I use. I used to feel lame because I thought real artists don't do graphite transfers like that or use old pieces of plastic for palettes. And apparently he does lol so it doesn't matter. I knew in my heart that it didn't but it's reassuring. /randomsidenote

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    1. Yes, well most of us professional artists transfer our drawings just by thinking about and BAM!, it's done. But occasionally I like to pretend I'm just a lowly art student again and have to transfer my drawings the old-fashioned way ;-)

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  12. Big thanks to Dan and Jeff! I cant wait to get home and paint. I would love to see more vids like this and love the other technical articles like the photographing your work. This blog is a great resource. Thanks for taking the time to make it happen!

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  13. Thanks for sharing, Jeff. I was wondering how long does it takes for that air cilinder to get empty. I've been using the air compressor for years, and the noise is really a trouble when working at night. Thanks, please show us some more videos when you be able to.

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    1. Depending on use, the air tank can last quite a long time or not. I don't use mine all that much and when I do use it, I'm not doing an entire painting with the airbrush, but only a few effects here and there. So my air tank lasts me over 5 years or more before I have to get it refilled, which only costs about $10-$20.

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  14. Tremendously enjoyed this video. Thanks for sharing!
    Great to see the old tooth brush splatter in action, too ;)

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  15. This was great! I've been painting digitally for a long time now and felt intimidated by the thought of returning to traditional media (which I didn't really learn very well in the first place!). I really didn't know where to start, and this has given me a great deal of information and inspiration :)

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  16. The painting is awesome. How do they have this kind of talent?

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  17. Superb and inspirational, nicely presented. I was surprised in the difference in size between the original and the final use on a card, it all seems to scale down perfectly and still retain detail.

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  19. This was a really great contest and hopefully I can attend the next one. It was alot of fun and I really enjoyed myself..
    Kevin

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