Saturday, February 7, 2015

Mixed Media Techniques

-By Jeff Miracola

Illustrator Jeff Miracola has uploaded a lot of wonderful videos lately to his YouTube page. Below are a few brief but informative videos outlining Jeff's techniques for a variety of media, including oil, acrylic, and digital mediums.







10 comments:

  1. Oh man! Thanks so much for these videos.
    I'm loving the application of all the different medias at once.
    I am paying particular attention to times when you blend the medias all together.
    Oh and that life painting of Jinx was EPIC!

    Is there a certain ratio to water you use with your acrylics to get them that thinned out and would you recommend a brand? Lastly... any tips of mixing colors really easily?

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    1. Thanks Matt. There is no hard and fast ratio I go with. I just go by feel. As for brand, I like different brands for different reasons. I use three brands of acrylic paints consistently, Liquitex hard and soft body, Golden fluid acrylics, and Badger airbrush paints.

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    2. I'm all about the Golden Transparent Airbrush colors lately. They are perfect for washing in an underpainting. Very transparent (so you don't lose your drawing), very vibrant, and they don't get rubbery if you use them right out of the tube.

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  2. Thank you very much for the videos, I'm starting a painting with oils tomorrow and I'm very nervous. How much the linseed oil takes to dry? I will have to hurry to paint the area before it dries? If it dries, will be harder again to disperse the paint?

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    1. And can I use turpentine with the linseed oil? Can I use only the linseed?

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    2. You do not want to mix turpentine with linseed oil. But you can use both in the same painting. You could thin your paints with turpentine to block in colors, but then let it dry before you decide to start working over it with paint that is mixed with linseed oil.

      As for drying times, if you want your paint to dry faster, you should use a product called Liquin. Like linseed oil, it will thin your paints, but it drys much faster. As for how long it takes linseed oil to dry depends on many things. some paint colors dry faster than others. For instance, white and yellow take much longer to dry than black or blue. I've worked on paintings where I use straight yellow or white mixed with linseed oil and it still takes 5 days to dry completely. Using liquin, it could be dry in a matter of hours or one day.

      Good luck on your painting.

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    3. Actually, you can mix turp and linseed oil. I do it all the time. You just don't want to add too much turp. Linseed oil is essentially a fat, and adding too much solvent will break up the lipid chains, which means the oil will lose it's structural integrity. But if you keep the turp to less than 40% or so (that's just a guess), you'll be fine. In fact, it's a very good way to control the fat ratio of your pigment, making it easier to follow the 'fat over lean' rule of painting. Use just turp at the beginning stages, turp and oil in the mid stages, and just oil at the later stages.

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    4. Thats another thing I forgot to ask, how much linseed oil I can use without ending with a forever-wet painting? Also, I'm feeling ridiculous asking this, but can I varnish (Using spray) between the layers before the paint is dry when touching to move to the next layer?

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    5. I'd listen to Dan then about the linseed oil/turpentine mix thing. I have never been able to get that to work well. The linseed oil always separates. But clearly I am using too much turpentine.

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  3. Is it possible to only use linseed oil and no solvents at all? I live in a cold climate and ventilation is difficult. Thanks!

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